Nerd Lunch visits Flippin’ Great Pinball

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Nerd Lunch visits Flippin’ Great Pinball

CT has never been into arcade games but on episode 308 of the podcast, he wound up being on a show talking about them. Rob from Flippin’ Great Pinball reached out to CT to let him give a few games a try. On this video version of an Extra Helping of the podcast, CT tries Play Choice-10, Joust, Street Fighter II, Donkey Kong and Galaga.

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By | 2018-06-25T12:34:01+00:00 June 25th, 2018|Categories: Extra Helping, Podcast|2 Comments

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Nerd Lunch co-founder and podcast co-host

2 Comments

  1. Jack T. June 25, 2018 at 7:04 pm - Reply

    What a flippin’ great little shop. If I’m ever in Tallahassee, this will be my second stop, right after your house! But I come not to threaten you, but to offer a few observations. I was never an arcader myself, but I bonded with my kids in the ’80s over NES and Sega, and have played a number of these games. You got to play for how long, an hour or two? The learning curves on these games can be very steep, and require many hours of play before you become really adept at any of them. Also, like typing I suppose, you can’t really call yourself a typist until you can do it without looking at the keyboard. If you were to play long enough to gain a high degree of facility, your favorites might change as you got into the action.

    Here’s another point of interest. I still play Xbox games with my grown children, and we have a wonderful time, mostly on shooters and fantasy or sci-fi quests such as Left 4 Dead, Gears of War, and the Baldur’s Gate series, but the fundamental infrastructure of the games has changed dramatically over the 30+ years since those games were big. A couple of years ago, my daughter bought me that miniature NES that comes pre-loaded with 25 of their “Greatest Hits” including Donkey Kong, Legend of Zelda, and a couple of the popular fighting games. We still haven’t done much with it, because compared to today’s games, they are just abysmally difficult. Bullets, birds, and other dangerous projectiles appear from nowhere off the edge of the screen, one hit generally takes one of your three lives, and evasion is often rendered impossible by the pattern of the “randomly” appearing projectiles. Every time we try to play one of these, we give it up within about ten minutes, look at each other, and ask “How did this ever become a thing?” Our youngest grandson is 11-years old, right at the age of the target audience of these first systems, and he doesn’t have a minute’s patience for any of it. Literally, he lasts about a minute before he rage-quits and turns on Left 4 Dead. The modern games have an engaging story, and if that’s your main interest, you have the option to turn the difficulty down and experience it in all its richness. The old ones were just run for your life, and there was little to no story to them, and no ending. They just kept getting faster and faster until you died.

    I commend you for making this effort, though, and expressing your opinions. You’re a fair-minded and entertaining narrator, and that’s a welcome combination on this-here interweb thingie. I hope you continue to entertain us for a long time to come!

    • Carlin Trammel June 26, 2018 at 8:38 pm - Reply

      Thanks, Jack. Obviously the experience of the video was somewhat manufactured, but the reactions to the games were still genuine. I completely understand the point about practice and becoming better with more experience. I certainly can see myself going back here. I’ve already had two or three semi-locals say they want to stop by this place. So I imagine I’ll be back soon. Still, I will gravitate towards the classics like Galaga. In fact, I’ve already downloaded a Galaga game for my phone. I’m not sure how I missed Galaga actually. We didn’t even have this on our old home system.

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